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Thursday, June 12, 2014

Entry gates


As I was walking my dog yesterday, and posting a few pictures on instagram, I realized that I take quite a few pictures of entry gates!  Gates are a common feature on many of the large (1 acre plus) lots in Buckhead, and the style of the entry gates often reflect the style of the architecture.  Here are some pictures of well done entry gates from my walks over the past few months.

When this house was first built, there were no gates; very few houses on this street have gates. A baseball player (who has since moved) bought the house and installed the gates. To see the inside and back yard of this house (and a  “before gates” picture, see my old blog post).

These gates were in front of a house on the Peachtree Battle Home Tour this year. The lanterns are by Bevelo, and placing them on the front of the posts is beautiful and a nice alternative to placing them on top of the posts.

Simple gates in front of a new McAlpine Tankersley house reflect the design style and color palette of the house.

The gates for this house were carefully design to reflect the aesthetic of the house. I love the lanterns on top of the gate posts. To see my blog post on this house, which was featured in Veranda, click here.

I snapped this picture yesterday. Although it is difficult to see in this picture, the ovals and diamonds on the gate match the same pattern that is on the balustrade on the portico.  Note how the gates are on an incline – these open out (towards the bottom of the driveway), which is sometimes necessary given Buckhead’s often hilly topography. The intercom is placed far enough away from the gates so they can open without hitting the waiting car.

This art deco style gate that was obviously custom crafted for this estate! The lanterns are so whimsical – they make me smile.

This gate caught my eye – I like the detailed ironwork. Note that this is an ‘old fashioned’ gate that must be opened and closed by hand!

A simple gate caught my eye on a recent walk. I wonder what the house looks like at the end of this driveway? It is not visible from the road.

This gate caught my eye because of the interesting hardware. Note how the stone on the pilasters flanking the gate is the same as the stone on the house. Also note the lantern, which is placed on the front of the pilaster.

This house was designed by Norman Askins. The gate is charming and the landscape creates a sense of arrival.

This Chippendale style gate looks so delicate. Note how the property is also protected by the rolling topography, which eliminates the need for a fence in addition to a gate.

I have never seen anyone enter or exit through these gates (there is a back entrance to the estate, which might be used more frequently), and they intrigue me every time I see them. This is a 13.5 acre estate, and the driveway is quite long. The property is planted with large mature trees, and the house can't be seen from the road.

I wouldn’t say entry gates are the norm in Buckhead; they tend to be found more frequently in the areas where the lots are larger.  Are entry gates a common feature in your neck of the woods? 

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7 comments:

  1. Well my little walk in the country with my dog Dakota pales in comparison to your walk! We see only fields and trees and you see gorgeous homes and gates, they are all so well done, wonderful neighborhood!

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  2. Those are beautiful houses, but I don't get having a gate unless you are a celebrity. It especially doesn't make sense to me if you have no fence or a non-massive hedge.

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  3. I get the sense that people put gates in for safety and crime prevention purposes. Although, I must say, I think it would be a pain to have a gate - you keep just as many people out that you might want to have access! Some houses have a compromise - the front of the house is accessible, and a gate is on the side that accesses the back of the house and garage.

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  4. Aren't gates intriguing...I always want to see "what's behind the garden gate...." These were really grand!! franki

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  5. Holly all beautiful and I love the unique Chippendale and Arts Deco styled gates! I had a gated home once and it did give a sense of protection and safety.

    xoxo
    Karena
    The Arts by Karena

    ReplyDelete
  6. Holly, as always, you have impeccable taste. These are some beautiful gates. I do love the art deco whimsy. It makes the home more approachable.

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  7. I love the invitation that the gates offer on the last image {but of course}.

    ReplyDelete

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