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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Dutch doors


When we planned out the details for the house we built, I was secretly hoping that we could incorporate a Dutch door somewhere in the design.  I am not sure why I had this on my list of things I wanted – I have never had a Dutch door, and I have not seen many of them in houses.

A Dutch door is simply a door that is divided horizontally. which enables the top portion and the bottom portion to operate independently. The advantage of this is that the bottom can be closed, while the top is open.  According to Wikipedia, “the initial purpose of this door was to keep animals out of farmhouses, or keep children inside, while allowing light and air to filter through the open top. This type of door was common in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century and appear in Dutch paintings of the period” (source).   Note the Dutch door in a painting dated 1645 by Samuel can Hoogstraten . Image source.

I see Dutch doors from time to time in Atlanta, mainly in the casual entrance (or friend’s entrance, as I have heard it called) of a home.  In Atlanta, given the weather and climate,  it seems as if the function is more charm that practicality; I wonder how many Dutch doors are actually utilized in the way in which they were designed given the mosquitos, pollen, and heat that are the norm in Atlanta much of the year!  I can see an exterior Dutch door used a lot at the beach, where catching the breezes is ideal, or in a climate where there is little need for central air or heat. Perhaps those shoulder months when it is pleasant outside, and there aren’t too many bugs or allergens in the air.  Regardless of aesthetics versus function, a Dutch door is a wonderful way to create that indoor/outdoor connection.

A splendid example of a Dutch door, in a space by Windsor Smith.  I love the turquoise tone that faces the outside.   Upon closer inspection, this appears to be a ‘double Dutch door’.

Image via House Beautiful, design by Windsor Smith.  In the magazine, Smith notes that for this particular house, a Dutch door was incorporated as it is a garden house, and the Dutch door was an ideal way to bring nature in.

Another striking image of a Dutch door (source unknown) with a beautiful architectural feature above – an overdoor with a round window.

This picture (source unknown) is quintessentially European, with the rustic elements, the stone floor inside and out, and the the beautiful rounded Dutch door.

This picture has a more American flair, and seems like a beachy environment given the colors and the architectural details.  A charming space, and the Dutch door makes it even more so.  BHDM Design, via House of Turquoise.

I have seen this picture quite a few times, but never really tuned into the fact that there is a Dutch door. Note the low height of the bottom portion of the door.  There are dozens of decisions behind every element in this photo! Image source, interiors by Amy Morris.

This looks like a very convenient position for a Dutch door – very easy to bring the groceries into the kitchen! Note how the door knob of this Dutch door is in the center of the door. Source unknown.

In this interesting space, it appears as if both sets of doors are Dutch doors.  Architecture by Jones Pierce Architects; interior design by Lori Tippins.

I would love to see the rest of the room to understand where it is in the house – it seems like an unusual place for a Dutch door.

I adore this image – the paneling on the Dutch door, and the dark color in contrast with the white exterior and interior, are beautiful. When a Dutch door is on the exterior, extra care must be taken to ensure that the locking mechanisms are adequate for the door. Note how high the lower part of the door is. Image source.

This room is fabulous all around – the wallpaper is one of my favorites.  I love how the stair carpet picks up the red tones in the wallpaper, and the Dutch door picks up the dark tones of the wallpaper.  The door is tucked under the stairs, creating an intimate and charming space.

This Dutch door, from a kitchen featured in Cote de Texas’ reader’s kitchen series, is charming both because of its placement in the kitchen, and the lovely blue color that is picked up in other design elements in the room.

A view of the kitchen with the Dutch door opened. The door swings out, which means it does not take up space on the interior (although most exterior doors seem to swing in, the door swing is often based on the physical constraints of the space – and this decision must be made carefully and thoughtfully while remodeling or construction!).    The kitchen’s owner had grown up with a Dutch door, so she wanted one in her house. She notes that the downside is that there is no screen.  To see post, click here.

Designer Michael Smith’s former home in Malibu had a Dutch door.

As I was looking through these wonderful images of Dutch doors, I realized that the vast majority show doors that go to the outside.  In my house, none of the doors that go to the outside were really ideal for a Dutch doors (instead, we did a lot of French doors), either in looks or functionality.  However, people do use Dutch doors on the interior too, and this is what we decided to do (more on that later).

I have read stories on Gardenweb of people using Dutch doors on laundry rooms, in public areas of their house (instead of a baby gate), at the entrance of a basement. I found a few examples that seemed to have a unique functionality inside a house.

Here is a great interior picture of a Dutch door, right in the middle of the action.  Dutch doors are wonderful for keeping kids and animals in spaces where you want them, without compromising an open feel to a door opening.  On another note, I had not seen this picture before, and I love the niches to the left and right of the stove, and the shelf above the stove. This is an interesting kitchen!

This appears to be a butler’s pantry, although it could be the main part of the kitchen. I wonder if the room beyond the Dutch door is a laundry room? Via Houzz.

I really like this picture of a Dutch door used in a little girl’s room.  My initial thought is that as the child got older, the Dutch door would be used less and less, but upon thinking further, I sort of wish that my teenage daughter’s room had a Dutch door – her door is always closed, which seems to unwelcoming – I would much prefer it to be ‘half closed’ with a Dutch door!

Here is a picture of the interior Dutch door that we incorporated into our design.  This picture shows how we closely matched the style to that of our other doors (the door to the right leads to the garage), but incorporated the top and bottom door. The Dutch door is shut and latched in this picture, which is a rare thing – we usually have it unlatched.

The latching mechanism is quite simple – just put the bolt down (on the inside of the door) when you want the door to operate as a regular door. Unlatch when you want the Dutch door. We keep it unlatched 95% of the time, and the top door swings out of the way into the laundry room.

Our Dutch door opens to the downstairs laundry room, and the entire area serves as a sort of mud room/storage area/occasional laundry room/dog area.  We use this room a lot because of all the functions it serves!  The main part of the space is laundry, a farm sink, and storage, and in a separate space tucked under the stairs is where our dog Ben sleeps at night in his crate.  He seems to loves it there - we often find him hanging out in this space during the day, as it is quiet and cool (the floor is limestone, which is particularly appealing to Ben during the summer as it stays so cool).

We put the Dutch door leading into the laundry room primarily because it creates a safe place for Ben when we have guests or contractors (when you build a house, you tend to have quite a few contractors coming in and out over the first 6 months!), but it does not make the space feel closed – it still provides light and air and a feeling that the space is still part of the next room.  The position you see the door in above is how we have it the majority of the time so that Ben can get in and out (his water and food bowls are in his area under the stairs).

Our Dutch door was made when all of the other doors were made, so I can’t really provide details on how it was made or who made it. Gardenweb seems to have some good DIY Dutch door pictures and examples.  The color on the walls in the paneled mud room is Whistler by ICI Dulux (this area gets little natural light, so the color looks quite gray-blue - in the light it is much more blue); the color inside the laundry room is Benjamin Moore Manchester Tan.  The floors are limestone with as small of a grout line as possible.  All door hardware is by Baldwin in their vintage finish.  The cabinet hardware is by Restoration Hardware; cabinets are custom.  The sink in the laundry room is a Shaws Original farmhouse sink.

A posed picture of Ben, behind the Dutch door.  He likes to be out with the family, so we rarely put him in here with the door shut, but it is very handy for those times when it is best that he is contained.

What do you think about Dutch doors? Do you see many of them in your area?  If you have one, let me know how you use it!  To comment directly on the blog, click here.



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70 comments:

  1. You always cover a topic in depth, then give it your own personal spin! Your Dutch doors look like the perfect solution for your space. Such an elegant 'mud room'!!!!

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  2. Nice post, pretty space. A suggestion: some sort of textured wallpaper in your laundry room would add a lot of character.

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  3. Some great inspiration for using dutch doors. I never thought about using them on the interior rooms like the laundry. What a great idea to keep our little four legged friends safe during a party. My favorite, however, is the black dutch door you show with the bench. I like how the upper portion is larger in size compared to the bottom. Again lots of great ideas.

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  4. love that laundry! We do a lot of interior dutch doors (DC climate isn't great for them either but we get the occasional request). For the most part we use them in pantries or laundry rooms to keep out small children and pets. In a past life, I worked for an architect who did health-care buildings and they were useful for bedrooms of alzheimer's units. Interestingly enough, the disease renders one to look down to the ground -not straight ahead. The dutch doors enabled the patients to be monitored by nurses while providing them with a sense of privacy. Fascinating!

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  5. You made me remember the era of closed doors on kids rooms, it seemed to last for decades. We'd have had twice the door slamming if my kids had Dutch doors.

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  6. I had a lovely Dutch door on the laundry room /mud room of my last home. LOVED it as it kept the animals in and the air circulating. In this house, I have a split louver door that functions with the bottom closed the same way. I am a huge fan of them for their elegance, practicality, innovation and simplicity.

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  7. I am especially fond of Door #3! Love the round window )with the light
    showing through) over the Dutch Door! Patty Day

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  8. ditch doors!!!
    i have always wanted one since childhood.
    i used to have fantasies of my horse poking his head in the kitchen....
    -through the dutch door-
    and me feeding him goodies!

    what a charm that would be.
    your examples are fabulous.
    xox

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  9. I desperately wanted one for my bedroom when I was little. Like begged my parents for years.

    I think your doggie corral application is brilliant.

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  10. I don't think I've ever seen a Dutch door before? I love learning about new things while reading my favorite blogs! This was a wonderful post and I so enjoyed all the images of the doors.. I'm sure I've seen a Dutch door before, but didn't even notice it..
    Thanks!

    Jan

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  11. I love dutch doors; in fact I like any doors that are unique!! Lovely Holly!

    xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  12. Absolutely love a Dutch door. Great to see so many different application possibilities.

    All best,
    Phyllis

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  13. I've loved Dutch doors ever since I saw a photograph of Kelly Harmon's beach house in Malibu, years ago. Her horse was looking in through the top half.
    Love seeing my friend Lisa's foyer here.... with the cherry blossom wallpaper.
    xoxo,
    pamela

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  14. I always said I wanted a Dutch door too but didn't end up putting one in for the exact reason you mentioned--didn't think I'd actually use it due to Mosquitos, pollen, etc. I have seen them on interiors before too but couldn't find a spot that worked for me. Maybe once we finish our house and move in and I see how our family really uses the space, I'll find a spot to switch a regular door to a Dutch door. Thanks for sharing your great post on this. I've missed all of your posts and insightful research and opinions.

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  15. As a teenager, I had a friend whose Front door was a Dutch door.I thought it was so cool and I told myself that someday I would have a house with a Dutch door. So now, 3o or so years later, I too have a Front door that is a Dutch door. We love opening the top as soon as we wake up in the morning, to let the first rays of sunshine in! It gives our house a very welcoming feel and people always comment on it as they walk by. Loved all the doors you posted!
    Cindy

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  16. I have Dutch doors in my home, but in my design, we call them Dutch windows because they are stationary on the bottom. I have a pair in the master bedroom and when closed they appear as a French door from the outside. Upstairs they were used in several of our children's bedrooms which had balconies. Again, the upper portion opened, the lower portion did not. I have a summer kitchen in addition to the main kitchen of the house and the Dutch window there is very useful particularly when grilling or cooking. In each instance where the Dutch window has been used, it is one of a pair. The second door is identical in design, but is a one piece functioning door. When closed, you would never suspect that they were different. The house was designed a few years ago by an architect from my area who specialized in French designs and had worked for clients who had homes in Southern France where these doors were very popular.

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    Replies
    1. Anon, if you come back and read this, several people have emailed me about your comment - they would love to see pictures! Email me at thingsthatinspire@gmail.com if you see this!

      - Holly

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    2. It is cloudy and overcast here today, but I will try to take some pictures with a bit of detail when things clear up. After reading my comment, however, I realized why you may have wanted a picture given the fact that I left out the most important piece of information which explains why these Dutch windows appear like French doors from the outside. There is a piece of molding that is on the outside just above the joint that you would expect to see between the stationary and functioning part of the window. That molding has a profile with enough slope to not only obscure the joint, but functions also to move whatever rain may blow against the windows/doors. I think if you now visualize this, it might explain better how you would never know from the outside that the top of these doors function as a Dutch door/window. In the case of the master bedroom, the bottom is a solid raised panel, but in the case of the ones on the second floor, they are perfectly matched to the window which of course are large panes of divided glass. The hardware in all instances where we have used this element is cremone bolts.

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  17. The fourth door with the rounded window is stunning. This makes me rethink doors. Would especially love to have one in the back.
    I knew that I had seen the box in Melanie's work somewhere, and it was in that gorgeous post! I am going to have to take another look now. I ran across her work and loved everything. Thank you for reminding me.
    Have a nice day.
    Teresa

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  18. I've been looking for a Dutch Door for our new home. I love them. What a beautiful post!

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  19. I have always loved the look of a Dutch door. If I thought it was practical where I live I'd put one in, however as previously stated it's the insects that would invade my home that keep the idea just that. But boy I wish I could put one in on the interior. I have a rear entrance that opens into the laundry which then leads into my kitchen. The door between the kitchen and laundry would be a great place to install one

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  20. Holly,

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading your pot thus morning! Growing up in upstateNe York, you didn't see many Dutch doors on houses. You did see them on barns periodically. My guess is for cross ventilation while keeping out things out that needed to stay out and vice versa. I do remember seeing several on my visits to Great Camps in the Adirondack Mountains. (Always with screen doors to keep bugs out...) We love to incorporate them into the cottages and beach houses we work on here in New England. They feel "right" some how...

    Cheers,
    John

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  21. I can't decide which photo I like the most! I'm a new fan of the Dutch door!

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  22. I have missed your beautiful blog posts! Keep it up, every time you post it is a little bit of beauty in my day.

    Jenna

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  23. First, I agree with Jenna - it is great to see you posting more these days! As I scrolled through this post, I noticed dogs in so many photos - and then, of course, there was your Ben. Beyond the architectural appeal, I love the functionality of the Dutch door in relationship to a family pet and how it harkens back to its original farmhouse use. When we re-modeled our house, we took out quite a few original doors between the central hall and public spaces. To this day, I am challenged by where to put my dogs when we have company. Alas, the Dutch door would have been the solution. Now, I can contemplate a new project!

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  24. Beautiful post Holly, thank you for the inspiration.

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  25. One thing I have always wanted was a Dutch door! But....I could never figure out how to have one, first when you live with cats that can't go outside because we live in coyote and bobcat country, and second, because we have BUGS.....and I know they are just waiting for the opportunity to live IN my house! We love to go to Balboa Island in Newport Beach, CA. where almost every house has a Dutch door! It is my fantasy to someday have one!

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    Replies
    1. I can't imagine a more perfect place for a Dutch door on the exterior than Orange County, CA - perfect weather, great ocean breezes (if you are near the ocean).

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  26. Hello, okay? I love your blog! Always follow! I'm from Brazil and would like to know and also understand, because it uses wood flooring in kitchens abroad! Here in Brazil we use a lot of pottery, porcelain, limestone, marble, tile, because we believe that becomes easier to clean. I find it very interesting wooden flooring in the kitchen, is very beautiful! But here in Brazil think impossible! Hugs and congratulations on your publications! Thankfully
    Adriana/São Paulo/Brasil

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    Replies
    1. Wood floors seem to be very popular in kitchens in Atlanta. Most people seem to want the continuity between all of the floor surfaces on one level. I have a wood floor in my kitchen in my house - first time ever, my old house had tile. I like the look of it, and we have it sealed with three layers of sealer, but I did have a mishap with a caterer and got some grease stains (which my floor guy was able to get out). He says that he has a new sealer - new even since my floors were sealed - that protects against grease stains as well as water stains.

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  27. My girlfriend did dutch doors for her kids bedrooms years ago. One is already out of graduate school! I love the idea just as you but don't understand how the bugs stay out. But the way you used it is my idea of perfect. I am glad to see Ben (aka house spy sidekick).
    Thanks for showing more of your finished house, I am loving all of it. MB

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  28. HOLLY, yes that is me screaming, I was reading the comments and anonymous at 2:22 am talks about her dutch windows. Please beg her to send you pictures. It is making my head spin to know what this looks like. Thanks, MB

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    1. I asked! We will she if he/she comes back - hard to track because it is anon! I would like to see them too.

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  29. It was wonderful to see dutch doors used so beatifully. I loved seeing your dog. With these beatiful dutch doors they can function also as animal or child's gates that you do not need to repair walls afterwards. And in my case with Jake (for those who do not know him he has significant special needs), I would love the have a door like your interior one so I could have him secure in his room but with me being able to easily see in and him being able to look out.

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  30. Hi Holly, I like dutch doors but you're so right about the bugs and heat, and I haven't ever considered one. But your laundry door is brilliant! (and yours so pretty!) I love that idea for the dog. The kids room is a good idea too. Have a great day, Robin

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  31. Replies
    1. He just got a big trim so he is looking good! He is a great dog, and a very willing accomplice to my house stalking walks.

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  32. My 1928 house here in the south has a Dutch door, and we didn't realize it until we moved in! Ours opens from our small galley kitchen (it is a 20's house) out onto the screened porch, so when the weather is nice we can keep it open and not worry about insects. It's good for corralling wet dogs, too. Love the charm of it.

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  33. I adore Dutch doors!!! Possibly it's the climate here in Chicago versus Atlanta, but we leave our windows open without screens all day long and don't have bug issues at all. I would love to add a dutch door one day!!

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  34. i moved to birmingham from atlanta last year. not many dutch doors here either, but i think they are as charming as can be. i just finished a total renovation as well, but didnt' think to use a dutch door until after we moved in. the future nursery is right off the kitchen, and it's the perfect spot for one. husband says we can get one when we need it. i will probably hold him to it :)

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  35. my favorite is the arched one - that is so gorgeous.

    one by one you are going to show us your house! just move onto the living room and staircase ok? I want to see that - plus the side entrance and the entrance to the kitchen! thanks!!! haha

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    Replies
    1. That's right! I just invited you guys into the back entrance. Will slowly work my way through the house! Lots of blog material, but you would be disappointed by the current state of decorating - I need a lot more furniture, a lot more styling. Suzanne and I are going to finish the decor on the main level one room at a time. Next year we are finishing the kitchen and family room.

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  36. As always, another interesting, informative & visually-inspiring post! Dutch doors are so charming! I actually have a question related more to your laundry room, if you don't mind! I'm in the process of finishing up a home renovation, and I'm now tackling our laundry room. I'm wondering what kind of countertop you used on top of your washer/dryer? Also, what kind of washer/dryer do you have? I remember from a previous post you wrote of needing to purchase a front loader, etc. Keep the wonderful posts coming!

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    1. My designer wanted me to use the same material that is on the floor - lueders limestone - but there is no way I would do limestone for a laundry room counter. So I picked caesarstone in misty carrerra. I actually love it - it is very durable and attractive. I do all of the silver polishing in there, anything that is a bit messy, as I don't want to get messy stuff on the marble in the kitchen. I cut flowers here, hand wash items, refill cleaning bottles, all sorts of menial household tasks take place here!

      Because this is a secondary laundry room (mainly for pool towels, dog stuff, kitchen towels), I didn't research washers/dryers too much. I asked the maintenance guy at the place where I buy appliances about his suggestions, and ended up getting a Duet washer and dryer. I like them, although in general I like top loading washers (we had to do a front loader in this space). They work well, and I don't get that moldy smell that is sometimes an issue with front loaders. They are very water efficient. I had one small issue that was an installation problem (not related to the washer), and the service guy suggested not putting a divider between the washer and dryer (as was done in my installation) because it makes things much easier if they ever need to be serviced - easier access to the back).

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  37. I love Dutch doors - they add such character to a home. Your's is lovely! Great post as always.

    xo
    cristin

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  38. I too, love Dutch doors and had one installed as my front door to my Seattle cottage about 4 years ago now. I found one already "dutched" at a local store (but you can have nearly any door dutched that isn't hollow core/costs around $100 to "dutch" it here in Seattle)) - it was an unusual door where they used a craftsman style door so the "dutch" cut was higher then waist-high. I am 5'10" and the cut is at my upper chest level. We added more decorative trim to the inset panels and beautiful polished brass hardware. I painted the inside white and the outside classic Red Delicious red by Ralph Lauren. The higher cut works really well in keeping people from entering the house easily when the top is open (no climbing over!)(we installed a brass loop lock on the bottom portion inside to keep the base from opening when the top is open because our top portion is where the actual door lock is located). And being cut that high, my cats can't easily escape when I answer the door by opening the top only, if its a stranger! Seattle has hardly any bugs and a fairly temperate climate so its a perfect door choice here! I found my door at Frank's Lumber on "the ramp" which means where the discounted doors go - it was a $700 door with a $100 dutch cut for only $349. I didn't hesitate to buy it!

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  39. A paneled mudroom! What an exquisite luxury! Your home is beautiful and it's been such a joy to follow your progress. Can't wait to see more! I am currently designing an "empty nest" for my husband and myself, as our last daughter is headed off to college this fall. Our pups are very much a part of our lives and will have their own "room" in our new home. I love the dutch door idea for this space! Thank you once again for your inspiring posts!

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  40. I love dutch doors! I've never had one, but always admired them. I think they add such interest to a home and also serve a functional purpose too! (Isn't that nice when that happens?!) We also put our dogs in the laundry room when we have visitors, and now you have me thinking that a dutch door would be perfect there! I am sure they would appreciate not feeling so shut out! :)

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  41. I was delighted to read such a detailed post about dutch doors, I recently used one in my renovation, so glad I did. You have inspired me to go home this weekend and finish painting it.

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  42. Hi, Holly -
    Enjoyed this post on Dutch doors, which I find charming! Your interior version is so beautifully done and cleverly executed. Lovely millwork and paneling, too. Thanks very much for sharing. Looking forward to seeing more of your home.
    Cheers,
    Loi

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  43. I agree with Loi! Your millwork and paneling is incredible…only second to the incredible dutch door! That has always been one of my most favorite things in the world! Seriously!! My dad's GI practice had them and I've loved them ever since! I could tell you a very funny story about one but won't on here! Your home is truly gorgeous and I always love reading your posts and ALWAYS come aways loving some particular detail! This time…it's rekindled my love of dutch doors! One day soon we are replacing all of the doors in our house and this has given me some wonderful ideas! Thanks for sharing!

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  44. I wish I could send photos... renting a home in Carmel and it has the most interesting semi-dutch door! It opens all as one door, but the window in the door pulls down flush, creating the same effect as a dutch door. And thinking, as one who lives in dallas and loves the idea of a dutch door, but practicality kills it, that you could screen the window section & have the WHOLE dutch thing!
    Let me know if you want to see pics!
    K

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  45. Holly, What a great blog. Love the post about the double doors and especially love your sneaking a Dutch painter in the top spot ---seventeenth century Dutch and Flemish painters are among my favorites (Vermeer gets top billing). Your blog is inspirational, so many terrific posts, thank you for sharing : ) Amal

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  46. I've always loved Dutch doors and am determined to have one some day! With a houseful of dogs, it would be a very practical alternative to baby gates and closed doors, both of which I hate!

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  47. Holly,
    This makes me smile, as I too, have an affinity for Dutch doors. They are so charming and seem to say, "you're welcome here". I love how you incorporated yours indoors, as I decided bugs are not my friends and therefore, dutch doors wouldn't work too well in our renovation. It might have worked going from my mudroom to laundry, except that we used a pocket door with glass, to save on space. But, it's a similar idea. You can see through it and you don't feel so closed off as you would with a solid door. Nor, do you feel too exposed.

    Love the Dutch door on the girl's room above. I'm sure when my boys get bigger...their doors will be closed, too. Sigh....
    xoxo Elizabeth

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  48. I love a Dutch door, but totally agree that they don't seem the most practical for an exterior door when you are in the pollen / allergy / suffocating heat of the South. Your Dutch door is fantastic! Love how functional it is with a dog. I think another great use for a Dutch door would be a child's playroom that is baby-proofed so Mommy can hear what is going on but knows baby stays in there while she empties the dishwasher, prepares dinner or anything else!

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  49. In regards to the room where you said, " I would love to see the rest of the room to understand where it is in the house – it seems like an unusual place for a Dutch door." It comes from Mary Ann Pickett's home that she features on her blog classic casual home.

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  50. I am such a fan of dutch doors, mostly for the charm and character they add to any space, but the functionality is wonderful. My sister has one in her kitchen that goes outdoors and the top is always open for a little fresh air. Love yours and it seems Ben does too!! Happy Friday ~

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  51. Love Dutch doors. Saw lots of them growing up in the Hudson Valley. My husband made one for our young daughter's room.
    She'd started sleeping after the death of her friends mother. Fell down the stairs before we could reach her. She wasn't hurt amazingly. We called it her puppet theater and she used to do puppet shows there. So she was safe but we could all hear each other. Dad had it up by the next night.

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  52. Love the pictures!! I always wanted one for the front door but you got me to thinking where I could actually use it - which is nowhere (sob). But I could use a half door at the bottom of the staircase going up and another at the top of the staircase going down. Did you see any good pictures of half doors? Or of anything that looked better than a baby/pet gate?

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  53. Great post, I appreciate such a great range of photos included on such a specific topic. Makes me want a Dutch Door too.

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  54. I like the style of dutch doors. The half door serves as free ventilation while open.

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  55. Loved this Post!!!!!!I have always wanted a Dutch door, you really did your homework on this one!!!!!!A wonderful reference!!!!!!!!!Maryanne xo

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  56. Love a Dutch door. Great post Holly.

    ~Angela Williams

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  57. These truly are the better alternative to having 10,000 baby gates up all over the house trying to corral children and pets alike. Some baby gates are even adult proof and are so hard to get in and out off. Perfect for letting in a nice spring breeze in too!

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  58. I love Dutch doors, and I am happy to see the revival of them.

    Thanks for putting this post together, it really shares some fantastic examples, especially the one in the kitchen with the map of Paris.

    Liz

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  59. I have two Dutch doors in my home. They are very charming. We mainly use them to corral our dogs.
    One door goes into the kitchen from the dining room and has 9 glass panes on top. The other door just has the bottom part and goes from the dining room into the den. Both doors have x paneling on the bottom. Love them!

    Robin

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  60. I love the dutch doors.. yes, great for toddlers, pets, some security and days when the weather it feels like it might turn - but what about offices? I think they would be great in some offices too.. A closed door means 'leave me alone' a half door means 'busy but still available'.. what do you think?

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  61. The design of exterior Dutch doors can be rightfully called a unique one as these doors can be half opened and half closed simultaneously, as they are horizontally divided into two halves.

    ReplyDelete
  62. The designs you've mentioned is good but i am looking for self closing gate hinges. Do you also deal in self closing gate hinges or not?

    ReplyDelete

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