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Saturday, January 29, 2011

2011 Cathedral Tour of Homes


This year, the 2011 Cathedral Tour of Homes is delighted to present four beautiful landmark Atlanta homes that exemplify the best of Atlanta’s architectural heritage, with 21st century updates from some of the most talented architects and designers in practice today. The Tour of Homes presents a rare opportunity to get a glimpse into these fabulous houses and grounds that represent the enduring legacy of Atlanta architecture and design.

The Tour of Homes will take place on Sunday, January 30th from 12:30 pm to 5:00 pm, and Monday, January 31st from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. Tickets cost $30. For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.cathedralantiques.org.   For architecture and design fans within driving distance of Atlanta, this is an event you can’t miss! The Cathedral Antiques Show and Tour of Homes is one of the biggest fundraisers for the Cathedral of St. Philip; this year’s beneficiary is H.E.R.O. for Children, an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for children infected with and affected by HIV-AIDS through enriching programs, unforgettable experiences, and connections with the community.

Last November, I interviewed the designers, architects, and homeowners involved with each home on the tour. When seeing the beautiful homes, and meeting the homeowners, it became clear that each house had its own story. It was fascinating to uncover the story and relay it in the descriptions that I wrote – I enjoyed every minute of my assignment!  My write-ups were included in the special Cathedral Antique Show insert in the February Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles, now on newsstands.

My favorite interior and garden photographer, Emily Followill, documented the homes with her camera; Emily’s work has appeared in numerous publications (including Veranda, Southern Living, and Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles). I tried to time my visits to the houses in concert with Emily, as I love to see her photo shoots in action!   Emily donated her time and talents to this wonderful fundraising event, and the pictures are breathtaking. She graciously allowed me to use some of her pictures for this post; please visit her website (click here) for wonderful examples in her interior, garden, and lifestyle photography portfolio.

And so, without further ado, a sneak peek into the homes that will be on the Cathedral Tour of Homes this Sunday and Monday!  I would recommend either starting or ending with Fairfield Drive or Woodward Way; Fairfield Drive is the furthest north (not far from Chastain Park), and Woodward Way is the furthest south (although all of the houses are within a few miles of each other).  


Fairfield Drive

101109_061finalWM
Long considered one of the most architecturally significant houses in Atlanta, this James Means masterpiece evokes the feel of a country home, yet is located only minutes from central Buckhead.

 101109_078finalWM
Completed in 1966, the house was truly a labor of love for Means and the original homeowners, who together painstakingly researched the Virginia Tidewater style of the mid-18th century. Two of the grand James River plantations, Carter’s Grove (c.1755) and Westover (c. 1734), were especially influential.  The bricks, floors, and slate roof were reclaimed, giving the home a feeling of great age.

101109_010finalWM
Recently, the new homeowners hired Norman Askins with project manager Michelle Moody to renovate and expand the house while maintaining the integrity of Means’ original design.  The main rooms were basically untouched, but the kitchen was reconfigured and sympathetic wings were added at either end of the house. All of the changes are in keeping with the style of the original house, but continue the story of its evolution.

101109_023finalWM101109_044finalWM
The interiors were gently updated by Virginian Ralph Harvard, who respected the original architectural details of the house while bringing it happily into the 21st century.  For example, Harvard incorporated antique wallpaper from Williamsburg that beautifully compliments the original Chinese paper supplied by decorator David Richmond Byers, and comfortable furniture and bright paints makes the house livable and cheery.

Jeremy Smearman of Planters created a landscape and hardscape design to enhance and complement the new additions to the home.

This is a rare opportunity to see one of the hidden gems of Atlanta architectural history.


Knollwood Drive

Watkins,Best Front
Designed by Clem Ford in the 1950s, this house has an immediate sense of presence from the moment it is first seen at the top of the curving drive. The French Normandy design, with its asymmetrical façade, stone and stucco exterior, slate roof, and simple ornamentation, combines a feeling of elegance with the strength characteristic of the architectural style.

The clean lines of the exterior provide a marvelous complement to the soft traditional décor of the interior and the magnificent detailed moldings in every room. The exquisite antiques collected by the homeowner further enhance the feeling of a Buckhead masterpiece.

101201_009finalWM101201_021finalWM101201_016finalWM
Other one of a kind touches include the beautiful serpentine staircase in the grand entrance of the house, as well as the light filled family living addition and kitchen renovation completed in 2003 by noted architect Kenneth Lynch.

The 2.4 acre property completes the portrait of this stunning home, with its combination of wooded views and sculpted grounds. Renowned horticulturalist Ryan Gainey designed the landscape; the abundant flowers, terraced gardens, and sophisticated hardscape create an intimate connection between the home and its environment.

This family home is truly one of a kind, and each and every room – indoors and out - has been enjoyed through the years. This is the kind of longevity and timelessness that is such a hallmark of the enduring legacy of Atlanta architecture.

   ◊

Arden Road

101110, TOH_039finalWM
The owners of this charming 1940s house moved from London several years ago, and fell in love with this home for its wonderful street presence, great bones, and gorgeous lot.  The house just needed a careful renovation to make it function for a family with growing children.

101110_016finalWM
With architect Linda MacArthur at the helm, Jane Hollman of Studio Entourage on kitchen design, and Debbie Anderson as design project manager, the goal of the renovation was to maintain the street character of the house, while making the inside more livable for an active family.  The first floor was extensively reworked (largely within the original footprint) to create more of a connection between the interiors of the house and the outside views, as well as create more usable space.

Interior designer Margaret Bosbyshell beautifully incorporated the homeowners’ antiques collected from travels all over the world, and also created the serene and uncluttered environment desired by the owners. 

101110_039finalWM
In mid 2010, the home’s living spaces were expanded with the addition of a separate pool house (built by Ladisic Fine Homes)  that was carefully planned to blend in seamlessly with the exterior of the original house, but on the interior reflect the homeowner’s interest in contemporary, streamlined design.  The original design team worked on this project, with the addition of Clary Bosbyshell on the interior design.  

101110_025finalWM
The results are spectacular combination of the traditional and the contemporary that is a great reflection of Atlanta in 2011.


Woodward Way

101119_185finalWM
This 1930s Georgian Revival is considered to be one of the most beautiful homes in Atlanta. The current homeowner fell in love with its charm and grace, and wanted to preserve this feel when she renovated in 2008.

101109w_013finalWM
The architectural team of Spitzmiller & Norris was hired to assist in bringing out the home's full potential, and the results are exquisite. The traditional 1930s floor plan was enhanced for modern day living by opening up the rooms to one another and improving the flow within the house. During the renovation, great care was given to preserving original features of the home, such as the elegant façade, the oak floors and mantels, and the large entry foyer with sweeping staircase.

 101109w_029finalWM
The renovation created more of a connection between the interiors of the house and the beautiful lot, increasing the views and access to the outside.  Nowhere is this more apparent than in the new screened porch, which wraps around the back of the house and creates a space that has the elegance of an indoor room, but with a rustic twist. Karla Morris and Monica Eith were responsible for the interiors of this special space; so integral is this room to the house that it feels as if it has always been there.

101109w_018finalWM
The fresh architectural backdrop created the perfect setting for the magnificent decor in the house, with interiors by Susan Kingery and the homeowner (who owns the wonderful Atlanta store Peridot Distinctive Gifts).  The colors are soft and soothing, the style traditional and elegant but with a comfortable feel. Many family antiques and wonderful collections, combined with eclectic pieces and vibrant art, give this house a look that is exceptionally beautiful, and very reflective of the homeowner.



Also part of the Tour of Homes, and new this year is ‘The Inspiration House’, located at 2799 Andrews Drive (entrance is included as part of the Tour of Homes ticket).   Ten talented interior designers were each invited to adopt a room at The Inspiration House; their assignment was to show visitors a fresh approach to including antiques in today’s homes.  Some approached the task from a layered, classically traditional viewpoint, others took a pared down sleekly modern approach, while still others skillfully blended elements of old and new.  See the tour page for more information: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/tour.html

Tickets are available online, at the Cathedral of St. Philip, or at the door.  See the ticket page for more information: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/Tickets.html

The Cathedral Antiques Show takes place from, February 2-5.  It is a wonderful opportunity to view and shop for beautiful antiques; attend learning lectures from experts in the fields of antiques, architecture, and design; or  bring an antique in for appraisal.

A full schedule of events can be found on the Antique Show website: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/schedule.html.  Of particular note are an evening lecture and reception with Vince Dooley on Friday, February 4th at 7 pm;  and a lecture by interior designer Suzanne Kasler and architectural designer Bill Baker on Friday, February 4 at 2 pm.

For more information, please visit the Cathedral Antique Show website: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/index.html


To subscribe to my blog by email, click here.
To follow my blog on Facebook, click here.
To see design, architecture, art, and decorative books that I recommend, please visit the Things That Inspire Amazon store.

Friday, January 28, 2011

Four Beautiful Homes

This year, the 2011 Cathedral Tour of Homes is delighted to present four beautiful landmark Atlanta homes that exemplify the best of Atlanta’s architectural heritage, with 21st century updates from some of the most talented architects and designers in practice today. The Tour of Homes presents a rare opportunity to get a glimpse into these fabulous houses and grounds that represent the enduring legacy of Atlanta architecture and design.

The Tour of Homes will take place on Sunday, January 30th from 12:30 pm to 5:00 pm, and Monday, January 31st from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm. Tickets cost $30. For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.cathedralantiques.org.   For architecture and design fans within driving distance of Atlanta, this is an event you can’t miss! The Cathedral Antiques Show and Tour of Homes is one of the biggest fundraisers for the Cathedral of St. Philip; this year’s beneficiary is H.E.R.O. for Children, an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for children infected with and affected by HIV-AIDS through enriching programs, unforgettable experiences, and connections with the community.

Last November, I interviewed the designers, architects, and homeowners involved with each home on the tour. When seeing the beautiful homes, and meeting the homeowners, it became clear that each house had its own story. It was fascinating to uncover the story and relay it in the descriptions that I wrote – I enjoyed every minute of my assignment!  My write-ups were included in the special Cathedral Antique Show insert in the February Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles, now on newsstands.

My favorite interior and garden photographer, Emily Followill, documented the homes with her camera; Emily’s work has appeared in numerous publications (including Veranda, Southern Living, and Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles). I tried to time my visits to the houses in concert with Emily, as I love to see her photo shoots in action!   Emily donated her time and talents to this wonderful fundraising event, and the pictures are breathtaking. She graciously allowed me to use some of her pictures for this post; please visit her website (click here) for wonderful examples in her interior, garden, and lifestyle photography portfolio.

And so, without further ado, a sneak peek into the homes that will be on the Cathedral Tour of Homes this Sunday and Monday!  I would recommend either starting or ending with Fairfield Drive or Woodward Way; Fairfield Drive is the furthest north (not far from Chastain Park), and Woodward Way is the furthest south (although all of the houses are within a few miles of each other).  



Fairfield Drive

101109_061finalWM
Long considered one of the most architecturally significant houses in Atlanta, this James Means masterpiece evokes the feel of a country home, yet is located only minutes from central Buckhead.

 101109_078finalWM
Completed in 1966, the house was truly a labor of love for Means and the original homeowners, who together painstakingly researched the Virginia Tidewater style of the mid-18th century. Two of the grand James River plantations, Carter’s Grove (c.1755) and Westover (c. 1734), were especially influential.  The bricks, floors, and slate roof were reclaimed, giving the home a feeling of great age.

101109_010finalWM
Recently, the new homeowners hired Norman Askins with project manager Michelle Moody to renovate and expand the house while maintaining the integrity of Means’ original design.  The main rooms were basically untouched, but the kitchen was reconfigured and sympathetic wings were added at either end of the house. All of the changes are in keeping with the style of the original house, but continue the story of its evolution.

101109_023finalWM101109_044finalWM
The interiors were gently updated by Virginian Ralph Harvard, who respected the original architectural details of the house while bringing it happily into the 21st century.  For example, Harvard incorporated antique wallpaper from Williamsburg that beautifully compliments the original Chinese paper supplied by decorator David Richmond Byers, and comfortable furniture and bright paints makes the house livable and cheery.

Jeremy Smearman of Planters created a landscape and hardscape design to enhance and complement the new additions to the home.

This is a rare opportunity to see one of the hidden gems of Atlanta architectural history.



Knollwood Drive

Watkins,Best Front
Designed by Clem Ford in the 1950s, this house has an immediate sense of presence from the moment it is first seen at the top of the curving drive. The French Normandy design, with its asymmetrical façade, stone and stucco exterior, slate roof, and simple ornamentation, combines a feeling of elegance with the strength characteristic of the architectural style.

The clean lines of the exterior provide a marvelous complement to the soft traditional décor of the interior and the magnificent detailed moldings in every room. The exquisite antiques collected by the homeowner further enhance the feeling of a Buckhead masterpiece.

101201_009finalWM101201_021finalWM101201_016finalWM
Other one of a kind touches include the beautiful serpentine staircase in the grand entrance of the house, as well as the light filled family living addition and kitchen renovation completed in 2003 by noted architect Kenneth Lynch.

The 2.4 acre property completes the portrait of this stunning home, with its combination of wooded views and sculpted grounds. Renowned horticulturalist Ryan Gainey designed the landscape; the abundant flowers, terraced gardens, and sophisticated hardscape create an intimate connection between the home and its environment.

This family home is truly one of a kind, and each and every room – indoors and out - has been enjoyed through the years. This is the kind of longevity and timelessness that is such a hallmark of the enduring legacy of Atlanta architecture.

   ◊

Arden Road

101110, TOH_039finalWM
The owners of this charming 1940s house moved from London several years ago, and fell in love with this home for its wonderful street presence, great bones, and gorgeous lot.  The house just needed a careful renovation to make it function for a family with growing children.

101110_016finalWM
With architect Linda MacArthur at the helm, Jane Hollman of Studio Entourage on kitchen design, and Debbie Anderson as design project manager, the goal of the renovation was to maintain the street character of the house, while making the inside more livable for an active family.  The first floor was extensively reworked (largely within the original footprint) to create more of a connection between the interiors of the house and the outside views, as well as create more usable space.

Interior designer Margaret Bosbyshell beautifully incorporated the homeowners’ antiques collected from travels all over the world, and also created the serene and uncluttered environment desired by the owners. 

101110_039finalWM
In mid 2010, the home’s living spaces were expanded with the addition of a separate pool house (built by Ladisic Fine Homes)  that was carefully planned to blend in seamlessly with the exterior of the original house, but on the interior reflect the homeowner’s interest in contemporary, streamlined design.  The original design team worked on this project, with the addition of Clary Bosbyshell on the interior design.  

101110_025finalWM
The results are spectacular combination of the traditional and the contemporary that is a great reflection of Atlanta in 2011.


Woodward Way

101119_185finalWM
This 1930s Georgian Revival is considered to be one of the most beautiful homes in Atlanta. The current homeowner fell in love with its charm and grace, and wanted to preserve this feel when she renovated in 2008.

101109w_013finalWM
The architectural team of Spitzmiller & Norris was hired to assist in bringing out the home's full potential, and the results are exquisite. The traditional 1930s floor plan was enhanced for modern day living by opening up the rooms to one another and improving the flow within the house. During the renovation, great care was given to preserving original features of the home, such as the elegant façade, the oak floors and mantels, and the large entry foyer with sweeping staircase.

 101109w_029finalWM
The renovation created more of a connection between the interiors of the house and the beautiful lot, increasing the views and access to the outside.  Nowhere is this more apparent than in the new screened porch, which wraps around the back of the house and creates a space that has the elegance of an indoor room, but with a rustic twist. Karla Morris and Monica Eith were responsible for the interiors of this special space; so integral is this room to the house that it feels as if it has always been there.

101109w_018finalWM
The fresh architectural backdrop created the perfect setting for the magnificent decor in the house, with interiors by Susan Kingery and the homeowner (who owns the wonderful Atlanta store Peridot Distinctive Gifts).  The colors are soft and soothing, the style traditional and elegant but with a comfortable feel. Many family antiques and wonderful collections, combined with eclectic pieces and vibrant art, give this house a look that is exceptionally beautiful, and very reflective of the homeowner.





Also part of the Tour of Homes, and new this year is ‘The Inspiration House’, located at 2799 Andrews Drive (entrance is included as part of the Tour of Homes ticket).   Ten talented interior designers were each invited to adopt a room at The Inspiration House; their assignment was to show visitors a fresh approach to including antiques in today’s homes.  Some approached the task from a layered, classically traditional viewpoint, others took a pared down sleekly modern approach, while still others skillfully blended elements of old and new.  See the tour page for more information: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/tour.html

Tickets are available online, at the Cathedral of St. Philip, or at the door.  See the ticket page for more information: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/Tickets.html

The Cathedral Antiques Show takes place from, February 2-5.  It is a wonderful opportunity to view and shop for beautiful antiques; attend learning lectures from experts in the fields of antiques, architecture, and design; or  bring an antique in for appraisal.

A full schedule of events can be found on the Antique Show website: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/schedule.html.  Of particular note are an evening lecture and reception with Vince Dooley on Friday, February 4th at 7 pm;  and a lecture by interior designer Suzanne Kasler and architectural designer Bill Baker on Friday, February 4 at 2 pm.

For more information, please visit the Cathedral Antique Show website: http://www.cathedralantiques.org/index.html



To visit my store, Quatrefoil Design, click here.
To subscribe to my blog by email, click here.
To follow my blog on Facebook, click here.
To see design, architecture, art, and decorative books that I recommend, please visit the Things That Inspire Amazon store.

Monday, January 17, 2011

View of the chimney pots

Last month I wrote a post about chimney pots, an architectural design element I had truly never noticed before, and now I see all over Atlanta.


Our chimney pots were recently installed, and I caught an interesting glimpse of them out of the quirky window that is in my daughter's bathroom (the space didn't really allow for a big window, so my architect created a little one to enable some natural light).  I enjoy this unexpected view so much that I might need to go peek out of her bathroom window on occasion!

These chimney pots are from Superior Clay, and are the Hampshire style.  I love that curved band on the side.


To visit my store, Quatrefoil Design, click here. 
To subscribe to my blog by email, click here. 
To follow my blog on Facebook, click here. 
To see design, architecture, art, and decorative books that I recommend, please visit the Things That Inspire Amazon store.




Saturday, January 15, 2011

Wood floor tips from an expert


My admiration for wood floors has been expressed many times on this blog.   Some of my all time favorite blog posts were on floors -  light colored floors (here), and another one on French style floors (here).

We are doing wood floors throughout the new house, both on the main level and the upstairs.  My designer, Suzanne, prefers 7 inch planks on the main level for my house; she says that anything larger than that takes on more of a casual look and feel,which is not the look for my house.  We might do 5 inch planks if the budget doesn’t allow for 7 inch; my architect suggested that the finish is most important, and if we need to spend a bit more on the finish, then we will balance the budget by doing smaller planks.  Although most of the main level will be planks, we are also planning on doing a herringbone pattern in the living room and one of the halls.

5354463904_efdbd3fa9c_b[1]
One of the most beautiful floors I have ever seen, in a house with interior design by Melanie Turner, home construction by Benecki Fine Homes.  Floors were by Olde Savannah. Image via Veranda.

Last year I had the opportunity to tour the production facility of one of the finest custom flooring companies in the United States, Olde Savannah Flooring.  They are based in Atlanta, but they produce custom floors for designers and customers all over the United States and beyond.  Their beautiful floors are frequently seen in projects that are featured in Veranda, Traditional Home, House Beautiful – to name a few.  When I visited their headquarters, I was thrilled to see a floorplan of a very large house with interiors by a top New York City based designer – and all of the flooring was being done by Olde Savannah.

img_Bremner_ss5[1]
A beautiful home in a recent Traditional Home, with interiors by Suzanne Kasler and floors by Olde Savannah. Image via Traditional Home.

I asked Bill Riley, president and founder of Olde Savannah Flooring, and Steve Brightman, one of their top salespeople, for their thoughts on wood floors from both a architectural and design perspective.  Here is what they said.

5353849003_c1769b0549_b[1]
A beautiful dining room, with interior design by Jim Howard.  No rug in this room allows for the beautiful custom floors by Olde Savannah to be a subtle but beautiful foundation for the room. Image via Veranda.
“The wood flooring in a home is a critical part of the perfect design. It should be a canvas or a place to start for the overall picture that a quality designer will create. It should not be the focal point but a back drop.”

5354463726_e40f827c2d_o[1]
Image via Traditional Home. Flooring by Olde Savannah.

“It would be very difficult to create a design for a beautiful French Normandy home if the house started with red oak strip flooring or an out of the box 4” short length polyurethane floor. Where a 7” wide by 5’ to 16’ lengths, lightly scraped, mix of rift and quartered and plain sawn white oak, in a warm brown color would create a place for a designer to start and be very successful.”

5353848795_1e3edf5727_o[1]
“When choosing a floor we recommend thinking and doing a little research of what has been used in the type of home being built or remodeled over time. Taking that information and inserting the design plan and that should be a great place to start. A good designer will almost always know. “
4377176081_ea2e9a4d1b_o1_thumb1[2]
A beautiful wood floor in an unusual chevron pattern, by Olde Savannah.

“We like to look at the grain of the wood first. Do you like an open grain such as plain sawn oak? A tight grain such as quarter sawn maple? Walnut is a highly prized grain as well as rift and quarter sawn white oak. The main idea is get a grain pattern that you like. Color should never be an issue at this point."
5354463836_7200763fd2_o[1]
Craftsmen hand waxing floors from Olde Savannah.

“Color and finish are very important. Most colors can be achieved on most species. Our favorite finish is hand applied wax. Of course most clients cannot or do not want to deal with the maintenance required for a wax floor. The alternative is a hand rubbed oil. This gives you the look of a waxed floor with the low maintenance of a polyurethane finish. We avoid poly because of the cheaper look. There is just something about pouring or spraying plastic on wood that real woodworkers avoid. We believe the floor should be treated like furniture and not a bar top.”

5354463842_fb7425caf4_o[1]
Image via Olde Savannah.

“We sell mostly random width floors. However single widths tend to look a little more formal.”

5353848805_b3ce13c042_o[1]
Image via Olde Savannah.

“We are seeing a lot of border work being done. Just low profile things like same color and species as the center of the room. Not different species and colors.”

We [Olde Savannah Flooring] are seeing the following in the market:
  • Never red oak (this is not really a trend)
  • Brazilian cherry is often cited as an upgrade, but it is not.  It’s also red and not a trend.
  • Environmentally responsible choices. Staying away from rain forest woods.
  • Planks are getting wider. We now see flooring in a 5” to 8: as normal with widths regularly going to 11” or even 12”.
  • Long lengths. Setting minimums such as 3 feet or in some cases 8 feet and flooring boards going to 16 feet long.
  • We are selling more hickory than ever. However wide walnut is still far out in front.
  • We are seeing less ebony floor colors, but do a bit of dark floors with brown bleeding through to black color.
  • Medium browns to dark browns tend to be our best sellers.
  • Sheens are picking up a bit from the past.
  • Versaille, herringbone, and chevron patterns tend to dominate the parquet choices.
  • Elegant light hand scraping is very popular. Most hand scraping on the market is too heavy and looks contrived.
  • Light wire brushing on oak does very well.
  • Acid washed and hand colored very light walnut is one of our most popular colors.
  • Bevels are getting very small.
Trends:
  • Colors. Black, white and natural are emerging. Of course the usual cast of browns.
  • Finish. Oil. No polyurethane.
  • Types of wood. Hickory, walnut, rift & quartered white oak. Also, tight grains.
  • Widths. Wide.
  • Decision process.
  • Generally starts with an interior designer. What is the type or style of architecture and the interior. Traditional, contemporary, classical, eclectic?
  • Sometimes start with a species (walnut, oak, etc.) or grain pattern (open, tight, minimal, etc.)
  • Sometimes start with a color.

5353848853_13296795dc_o[1]
Image via Olde Savannah.

5354463856_b14908d11a_o[1]
A combination wood and stone floor, by Olde Savannah.

5353848763_241553e895_o[1]
Personally, I am partial to a wood floor with an interesting pattern, and Olde Savannah truly excels in this area.  They have worked with many designers and architects to recreate beautiful patterns originally seen in old homes all over Europe.

For more information on Olde Savannah Flooring, please visit their website:
Contact information:

Phone: 404-691-3834
Fax: 404-691-4082
Contact Steve Bright with questions: brightlines@comcast.net

Readers, anything you want to share on wood floors, any type of wood floor you particularly like, or any questions you might have for Olde Savannah? If so, please post your question or observation in the comment section (email subscribers, click here for the comment form). 

No goods or services have been exchanged for this post.

To visit my store, Quatrefoil Design, click here.
To subscribe to my blog by email, click here.
To follow my blog on Facebook, click here.
To see design, architecture, art, and decorative books that I recommend, please visit the Things That Inspire Amazon store.


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